When it comes to birthdays, do you think the card matters as much as the gift? We do, and never want to be without the perfect handmade birthday card with a personal message. DIY birthday cards are one of the things people often keep longer than the gift, so we always want to make sure to give cards that are extra special and thoughtful. What better way to get a card like this than to make one? Well, this was my thought, anyway. However, when I went looking on Google and Pinterest for handmade DIY birthday card ideas, I did not find exactly what I was looking for. There were lots of free printables from big sites like Greeting Island, Blue Mountain, and even American Greetings, but those lacked the homemade touch I was going for. See, I make lots of my gifts, so adding a cheap looking printed card just won’t do. I was looking for inspiration and step by step tutorials for cute cards to make at home, ones I could be proud of. After the free cards, I came across more tutorials than I could count from sites trying to sell me scrapbook supplies and die cut templates. I understand you have to make money, DIY people, but please, don’t try to sell me stuff to make a simple greeting card, or at least show me I can make one without it. Not nice when you just want some birthday cards you can actually make! I was not looking for some frilly thing that came off looking like a scrapbook, anyway, thank you.

On June 13, 2013, documentary filmmaker Jennifer Nelson filed a putative class action suit in federal court for the Southern District of New York against Warner/Chappell in the name of her production company, Good Morning to You Productions.[5] As part of a documentary she was making about the song and its history, she had paid US$1,500 to secure the rights. Her complaint relied heavily on Brauneis's research, seeking not only the return of her money but all royalties collected by the company from other filmmakers since 2009.[10][29][30] A week later a similar case was filed in the Central District of California, Rupa Marya v. Warner Chappell Music Inc, Case No. 2:13-cv-04460.[31] Five weeks later, Nelson refiled the case there,[32] and the cases were combined.[33][34][35] As of April 2014, Warner's motion to dismiss had been denied without prejudice, and discovery began under an agreed plan with respect to Claim One, declaratory judgment as to whether "Happy Birthday to You" is in the public domain. The Motion Cut-Off as to Merits Issues on the Claim One deadline was November 7, 2014. After that, the court was expected to rule on the motion for summary judgment as to the merits issues on Claim One.[36] A jury trial was requested.[37]
Not sure how to bring your idea to life? Our knowledgeable and friendly custom printing team is here to lend assistance. Looking for something extra special? Consider adding a bright foil stamp for extra shine. Or, have your birthday greeting cards die-cut for a truly unique shape. You’re in control with PsPrint, your best choice for an online printing partner! And don’t forget, we also offer birthday invitation card design templates, envelopes, envelope seals, save-the-date magnets and more to make your birthday greetings extra special.
Warner/Chappell Music acquired Birch Tree Group Limited in 1988 for US$25 million.[10][11] The company continued to insist that one cannot sing the "Happy Birthday to You" lyrics for profit without paying royalties: in 2008, Warner collected about US$5,000 per day (US$2 million per year) in royalties for the song.[27] Warner/Chappell claimed copyright for every use in film, television, radio, anywhere open to the public, and for any group where a substantial number of those in attendance are not family or friends of whoever is performing the song. Brauneis cited problems with the song's authorship and the notice and renewal of the copyright, and concluded: "It is almost certainly no longer under copyright."[3][16]
Warner/Chappell Music acquired Birch Tree Group Limited in 1988 for US$25 million.[10][11] The company continued to insist that one cannot sing the "Happy Birthday to You" lyrics for profit without paying royalties: in 2008, Warner collected about US$5,000 per day (US$2 million per year) in royalties for the song.[27] Warner/Chappell claimed copyright for every use in film, television, radio, anywhere open to the public, and for any group where a substantial number of those in attendance are not family or friends of whoever is performing the song. Brauneis cited problems with the song's authorship and the notice and renewal of the copyright, and concluded: "It is almost certainly no longer under copyright."[3][16]
The documentary film The Corporation states that Warner/Chappell charged up to US$10,000 for the song to appear in a film. Because of the copyright issue, filmmakers rarely showed complete singalongs of "Happy Birthday" in films, either substituting the public-domain "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow" or avoiding using a song entirely. Before the song was copyrighted it was used freely, as in Bosko's Party, a Warner Bros. cartoon of 1932, where a chorus of animals sings it twice through. The copyright status of "Happy Birthday to You" is directly referenced in a 2009 episode of the TV series iCarly, "iMake Sam Girlier", in which the main character as well as others begin to sing the song to Sam but are prevented from doing so by Freddie, who says the song isn't public domain; "For She's a Jolly Good Fellow" is then sung instead.
A standard greeting card is printed on high-quality paper (such as card stock), and is rectangular and folded, with a picture or decorative motif on the front. Inside is a pre-printed message appropriate for the occasion, along with a blank space for the sender to add a signature or handwritten message. A matching envelope is sold with the card. Some cards and envelopes feature fancy materials, such as gold leaf, ribbons, or glitter.
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